What is Inflammation?


Redness,You’ll see in a lot of scientific studies that serrapeptase works as an anti-inflammatory.  But what does that mean?  This animated video explains what inflammation is and why it is present in our bodies.

Acute Inflammation

My Notes:

  • Inflammation is the protective reaction of vascularized tissue to local injury.
  • Acute inflammation is the early reaction of tissue to the injury.  It is the first stage of wound healing.  It can be triggered by cell or tissue damage or the presence of dead cells or bacteria.
  • Acute inflammation occurs before the immune response in an effort to remove the causing agent and limit the extent of tissue damage.
  • There are two stages to acute inflammation – vascular and cellular.
  • In the vascular stage fine blood vessels near the site of injury restrict briefly (reducing blood flow) and then dilate.  This dilation increases the movement of fluid into the affected region.  This results in the five classic signs of inflammation.  Redness, swelling, heat, pain and loss of function.
  • Around the site of injury, clotting occurs.
  • The cellular stage of acute inflammation begins with the movement of phagocytic white blood cells or leucocytes.  These squeeze through the capillary wall and into the tissue.  Leucocytes engulf and destroy any bacteria and dead cells. 
  • Histamine, serotonin and other mediators are released in response to the injury to “mediate” the inflammatory response.
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About Andy

I suffered a serious neck injury when I was about 19 years old. That problem didn't affect me until I was in my 40s, but I then suffered two prolapsed discs in my neck and problems with my right arm and hand. Serrapeptase was recommended by my chiropractor to try to break up the scar tissue around the vertebrae that were causing me the problems. It seemed to help me with my problem, so created this site to help inform people what serrapeptase is, what it can do and just as importantly, what it cannot do. I hope you find the information useful.

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